If You See An Animal In Danger – Please Read

The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don’t do anything about it – Albert Einstein

This quote has been in my mind all day. This morning while driving to work i saw several geese in the road. Thinking they were trying to cross the road, i slowed down. Then i saw that one of the geese had been hit by a car still alive and flapping his wings, and the other geese were flocking around him to protect him, it seemed. There was a lot of traffic flying by. No one slowing down or stopping. I quickly pulled off the road and called PETA’s emergency after hours number. If this poor being was hurt and suffering, i wanted to do anything i could to help. As i quickly walked to the goose, in the rain, dodging traffic which neither stopped or slowed down, another car hit him. By this time i am becoming very emotional and not thinking as logically as i typically would. The fieldworker on the other line of the phone instructed me to pick up a stick along the way, to safely determine if the goose was still alive or not. Once i got to the goose, he was now motionless, all of his flock that were there beside him a minute ago were gone. I lightly touched the inside corner of his eye to search for a reflex, twitch or any sign of life. I was too late. He was already gone. At least he was no longer suffering. With PETA still on the line she told me that i had done all i could, i did the right thing and that there was nothing else i could do at this point. She asked if i could get the poor dead soul to a median or off the road, as i was standing beside him, in the middle of the road, in the rain in busy traffic, another truck ran over him… while i stood right there beside him. At that time she instructed me to get out of the road because it wasn’t safe for me, and she didn’t want me to get hit. As i walked back to my car, in the rain, in a not so nice area of Norfolk, i cried and cried. I tried but i was too late. But all those other people, who sped by. Not slowing down, not stopping – but rather still continuing to run over him, while i stood right there. How can people be that way?

When i got to work i was so upset, so sad, so angry and so disappointed. I saw this in my mind all day long, on the verge of tears all day. For people to act like a life is so insignificant, so unimportant – it makes me ashamed to be a part of this human race… that is so callous, so uncaring, such a lack of empathy. Every life is significant, important, precious… human and animal.

If you see an animal along the side of the road, in distress, suffering, pleading for help, PLEASE do not be one of those people who drive by and look the other way, who ignore it and go along with your day. Be the exception. Stop and provide any assistance you are able to give. Help this poor suffering soul. You can call PETA’s emergency line, local or national, and they will walk you through what to do, help keep you calm, and send help if necessary.

If you happen to be in such a situation:

• Remain calm. Be sure to note your exact location, including mile marker if you are on a highway.
• Immediately and carefully pull over and put your hazards on. Please be extremely aware of the traffic around you and exercise caution. You won’t be saving any animals if you get hit yourself. Be careful and don’t take risks that you don’t need to take.
• Determine if the animal is dead or alive. Some ways to do so:
1. Is the animal stiff? This would mean that s/he’s been deceased for some time.
2. Is the animal breathing? With furry animals the wind can fool you so look carefully. Injured animals often labor to breathe or breathe rapidly – observe the chest and abdominal area for movement.
3. If an animal is still warm to the touch but you note no breathing or other signs of life, gently pinch a back toe to see if the animal pulls back. If safe and feasible, you may also gently position your finger against the animal’s eye to test for a blink reflex.
• Unless you are trained and have experience, do not attempt to move injured animals without assistance from a trained individual. Some animals, including foxes and raccoons, may be rabid and could pose a danger to you and/or your animal companion. Animals who have been hit/injured—including dogs and cats–are more likely to bite out of pain, fear and panic. So before you try to move anyone, call for help.
• Call your local animal control agency or police dispatch, or, if you can’t reach a live person, do not hesitate to call 911. Calmly state your emergency: “I am calling for an animal control officer. I have just found an injured animal who has been hit on highway 464, heading north, and the animal is still alive. This animal is suffering very badly and needs help. Can you please send an animal control officer right away? I am pulled over next to the animal, and we are between the 64/464 entrance ramp and exit 2/Military Highway. I am in the red pickup truck.” It’s never a bad idea to ask for the officer’s ETA. I also recommend checking back in with dispatch if an officer is not on-scene within a few minutes.
• Do not leave the scene. This is so important. Do not leave that animal. What if the officer cannot find her? What if the seemingly impossible happens and she crawls into the woods and can’t be found? You absolutely 100 percent cannot leave the scene until the safety of the animal is secured. Wait for that office to arrive please.

Of course, never ever hesitate to call PETA for advice and guidance. During the day, just call 757-622-PETA and have us paged. Afterhours, in Hampton Roads, call 844-441-9398, and for afterhours emergencies anywhere else, call 757-434-6285. Program these numbers into your cell phones please.

From working at PETA, i knew this information and had these numbers, but i wanted to share this so that anyone who reads this has these numbers and are equipped with the information and knowledge to be the rare compassionate souls who help, rather than one who turns a blind eye.

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Animals in Hot Cars – Extremely Important to Read and Share

Anyone who knows me knows that when it comes to animals, I have very strong opinions and will not hesitate to speak my mind.   Now that the weather is starting to get warmer,  I want to make sure people know how imperative it is that you do not leave your dog, or any other animal (or child for that matter) in the car alone.  Even if it is your intention to just “run into the store” to pick up something quickly, you never know what can happen to delay you.  You may bet caught up in a long line, or price check problems, or a multitude of circumstances that could delay your return to your fur friend locked in the car.  For this reason, I say that no length of time is alright.

This following picture is what sparked the debate on facebook.  It was posted on a the page of a radio station, I believe, with the caption of “What do you think, would you do the same thing?”

I was so infuriated by some of the comments on this site about this picture.  People were saying how this person should be arrested for breaking and entering, trespassing and larceny.  Are you kidding me?  This person should be commended and thanked and thought of as a hero who potentially saved this dog’s live, not a criminal.

Sometimes I have a hard time remembering that not everyone thinks the same way I do, or has the same compassion towards other living beings as I do.  But to me, this should be common sense.  How is it not?  How can anyone think it was okay to leave their companion animal alone in a hot car, for any amount of time?… An animal who you love and share your home and life with.

It is also very important to know what to do, as a citizen and compassionate person, if you see an animal alone in a car on a hot day.  Please do not turn the other cheek and walk away.  Please do the right thing.  If you are not comfortable  enough to do what the person above did then call the authorities.  Do not leave the dog alone.  Wait until help arrives before leaving.

Here is a link to a great, informative article.  Also, below I have copied and quoted it as well.  I feel the information is too important to try to rewrite so I am coping it word for word.

http://www.peta.org/issues/companion-animals/dog-hot-car.aspx

Dogs in Hot Cars

Every year, dogs suffer and die when their guardians make the mistake of leaving them in a parked car—even for “just a minute”—while they run an errand. Parked cars are deathtraps for dogs: On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to between 100 and 120 degrees in just minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the interior temperature can reach as high as 160 degrees in less than 10 minutes.

Animals can sustain brain damage or even die from heatstroke in just 15 minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and by sweating through their paw pads.

If you see a dog left alone in a hot car, take down the car’s color, model, make, and license plate number. Have the owner paged in the nearest buildings, or call local humane authorities or police. Have someone keep an eye on the dog. Don’t leave the scene until the situation has been resolved.

If the authorities are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back up your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal from the car, and then wait for authorities to arrive.

Watch for heatstroke symptoms such as restlessness, excessive thirst, thick saliva, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and lack of coordination. If a dog shows any of these symptoms, get him or her out of the heat, preferably into an air-conditioned vehicle, and then to a veterinarian immediately. If you are unable to transport the dog yourself, take him or her into an air-conditioned building if possible and call animal control: Tell them it is an emergency.

Provide water to drink, and if possible spray the dog with a garden hose or immerse him or her in a tub of cool (but not iced) water for up to two minutes in order to lower the body temperature gradually. You can also place the dog in front of an electric fan. Applying cool, wet towels to the groin area, stomach, chest, and paws can also help. Be careful not to use ice or cold water, and don’t overcool the animal.

PETA offers leaflets that can be placed on vehicles to remind people never to leave unattended animals inside. For information on ordering PETA’s “Don’t Let Your Dog Get Hot Under the Collar” leaflet, please click here.

Simon Cowell stars in PETA’s public service announcement (PSA) informing viewers of the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars. You can help spread the message by contacting us at ActionTeam@peta.org or 757-622-7382 for information on how to get the PSA aired on your local television stations.”

Do the right thing if you see this.  Read this and please pass it on.  This is something everyone should read and understand.  It is a matter of life or death.